Faktoren, die mit Stürzen assoziiert sind

Instabilisationsfaktoren, die mit Stürzen assoziiert sind

Posturale Instabilisationsfaktoren Stärke der Assoziation zu Stürzen
Verschlechtere posturale Stabilität während des Stehens ++
Verschlechtere posturale Stabilität während des Vorneigens des Oberkörpers und Vorreichen des Armes  

++

Verschlechtertes Vermögen auf externe Störreize adäquat zu reagieren +
Verlangsamte willkürliche Schrittreaktion bei der Applikation visueller Stimuli ++
Verlangsamte Gehgeschwindigkeit, erhöhte Gangvariabilität und Defizite in der funktionellen Mobilität unter Einfach- und Doppeltätigkeitsbedingungen  

+++

Verschlechtertes Vermögen aufzustehen +++
Verschlechterte Leistung, Hindernissen auszuweichen und normal weiterzugehen +++
Erläuterungen:

+++

++

+

Einfachtätigkeit

Doppeltätigkeit

 

Starke Beweislage

moderate Beweislage

schwache Beweislage

geringe oder keine Beweislage

Stehen oder Gehen

kognitive oder motorische Zusatzaufgabe während des Stehens oder Gehens

Tab. : Auflistung von Instabilisationsfaktoren, die mit Stürzen assoziiert sind (eigene Darstellung) (vgl. (vgl. CRANACHER / CONZELMANN, S.34 – In: ZAHNER / STEINER – Kräftig altern)

 

 

 

JÖRG LINDER AKTIV-TRAINING
Mauerbergstraße 110
76534 Baden-Baden
Tel.: 07223 / 8004699
Mobil: 0177 / 4977232
Mail: info@aktiv-training.de
Fax: 07223 / 8005271 
Lauftherapie und Lauftraining: http://lauftherapie.blogspot.com
Stuzrprävention: www.sturztraining.de
 
 

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Upper Body and Abs Workout

Video von:  Rocofit / Upper Body and Abs Workout – September Shape Up Challenge  /  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5j8VIuuw-k&feature=relmfu

 

JÖRG LINDER AKTIV-TRAINING
Mauerbergstraße 110
76534 Baden-Baden
Tel.: 07223 / 8004699
Mobil: 0177 / 4977232
Mail: info@aktiv-training.de
Fax: 07223 / 8005271 
Lauftherapie und Lauftraining: http://lauftherapie.blogspot.com
 
 
 
 

Mobility – Thoracic Spine – floor

Video von:   Mobility – Thoracic Spine – floor   /    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=weLcono-BT0

 

Mobilitästraining für die Brustwirbelsäule / Bodenübugen

 

JÖRG LINDER AKTIV-TRAINING
Mauerbergstraße 110
76534 Baden-Baden
Tel.: 07223 / 8004699
Mobil: 0177 / 4977232
Mail: info@aktiv-training.de
Fax: 07223 / 8005271 
Ich-bin-dann-mal-fit: www.ich-bin-dann-mal-fit.com

Striking the Balance between Running and Health

By Dr. Dale Macdonald

As with all athletic endeavors, running comes with both great reward and inherent risk. More than 60% of runners will suffer an injury that causes them to take time off running – each year! Fortunately, by improving your balance, you can reduce your likelihood of injury. Balance is of such critical importance in activities like running that researcher’s have concluded „balance is the single most important component of athletic ability because of its implicit involvement in nearly all forms of movement“1.

Virtually all running injuries occur in the lower limb, with the majority of those targeting the feet, ankles, shins and knees. The preventative use of balance training tools such as Wobble Boards, Bongo Boards, SRF Boards and Combobble Boards has been shown to greatly reduce your likelihood of injury.

Balance is defined as a condition during which the body’s center of gravity is maintained within its base of support. Balance is a function of joint stability, and joint stability is influenced by the strength and proprioceptive abilities of the muscles, tendons, ligaments and joint capsule surrounding the joint. Your sense of balance is derived from three sources: your eyes, inner ear and „proprioceptors“. Proprioceptors are tiny sensors that are found in each joint and muscle in your body. These proprioceptors sense the position of your joint relative to the rest of your body3. Found in high concentrations around each joint of your body, they are also packed very densely in the muscles, tendons and ligaments in the ankle and upper neck. While your eyes, inner ear and proprioceptors are of equal importance when you’re standing still, dynamic activities such as running place disproportionately huge demands on your proprioceptors.

The good news is that we can improve our balance at any stage in life, young or old, injured or not, by the liberal use of Wobble Boards. Feed forward loops (as opposed to feedback loops) are the learned mechanisms that allow for the improvement in your balance with practice. Daily use of a Wobble Board for 6 weeks will greatly improve the anticipatory abilities of your proprioceptors, allowing your balance to improve by accurately anticipating any changes in your base of support.

Both neutral control and muscle strength are important components of joint stability. The stronger a muscle is, the better able it is to protect a joint from injury. The use of Wobble Boards is an incredibly effective was to strengthen the muscles of the foot, ankle, lower limb and core while stimulating the proprioceptors in these regions. With an increase in strength and improvement in balance, you run more efficiently and more safely. A great example of this is the decreased incidence of „shin splints“ and stress fractures by judicious use of Wobble Boards. In addition, a recent study showed that increasing your quadriceps strength (i.e. through the use of such aids as a BOSU ball, Bongo Board or SRF board) by merely 3% was associated with 1.2, 2.4 and 3.4% greater static balance, dynamic balance and quality of life, respectively2.

The most common and avoidable running injury is the ankle sprain. Ankle sprains cause mechanical damage to various structures of the ankle. Acute sprains also result in an important deficit in proprioceptive (balance) abilities. Prompt rehabilitation of an ankle sprain by daily use of a Wobble Board is vital to retrain the balance and position sensors that get injured when we sprain an ankle1.

Balance training will also help to strengthen your core musculature, which is of particular importance to runners. The impact forces associated with running are enormous. Your feet, ankles, knees and hips all help to absorb these impact forces, but your lower back still absorbs literally tons of force during a run. Research has conclusively shown that a stronger core leads to less back pain. More recent research has taken this one step further and shown that low back pain impairs your sense of balance (remember that joints are full of proprioceptors, and a sore joint won’t sense it’s position as well as a healthy one). So an interesting little link is established; running can make your back sore, but balance training can strengthen your core, improve your balance and reduce back pain!

All these benefits – just from working on your balance a little bit each day!

About the Author:

Dr. Dale Macdonald is a Chiropractor, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and Resident with the College of Chiropractic Sport Sciences (Canada). He is the director of Elite Sport Performance, and can be reached at: drmacdonald@elitesportperformance.com

References:

  • Blackburn, T., Guskiewicz, K. et al. Balance and Joint Stability: The Relative Contributions of Proprioception and Muscular Strength. Journal of Sport Rehabilitation. 9(4): pp. 315 – 329, 2000.
  • Carter, N., Khan, K. et al. Knee Extension Strength is a Significant Determinant of Static and Dynamic Balance as Well as Quality of Life. Gerontology. 48; pp. 360 – 369, 2002.
  • Greenspan, S.L., Myers, E.R. et al. Fall Direction, Bone Mineral Density, and Function: Risk Factors for Hip Fracture in Ambulatory Elderly. American Journal of Medicine: 104; pp. 539 – 545, 1998.
  • Gribble, P. The Star Excursion Balance Test as a Measurement Tool. Research Digest. The Pennsylvania State University. March, 2003, pp. 45 – 47.
  • Gunter, K., De Costa, J. et al. Balance Self Efficacy Predicts Risk Factors for Side Falls and Frequent Falls in Community-Dwelling Elderly. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity. 11; pp. 28 – 39, 2003.
  • Guskiewicz, K., Perrin, D. Research and Clinical Applications of Assessing Balance. J Spt Rehabil 5; pp. 45-63, 1996.
  • Newcomer, K.L., Laskowski, E.R. et al. Differences in Repositioning Error Among Patients with Low Back Pain Compared with Control Subjects. SPINE. 25(19); pp. 2488 – 2493, 2000.
  • Runner’s World. 38(5); pp. 22 – 23, 2003.
  • Verhagen, E., van Mechelen, W. et al. The Effect of Preventive Measures on the Incidence of Ankle Sprains. Critical Review. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. 10; pp. 291 – 296, 2000.

Quelle:  http://www.fitter1.com/About/Articles/runninghealthbalance.aspx

 

JÖRG LINDER AKTIV-TRAINING
Mauerbergstraße 110
76534 Baden-Baden
Tel.: 07223 / 8004699
Mobil: 0177 / 4977232
Mail: info@aktiv-training.de
Fax: 07223 / 8005271 
Lauftherapie und Lauftraining: http://lauftherapie.blogspot.com
 
 
 
 

 

Both Resistance and Agility Training Reduce Fall Risk

J Am Geriatr Soc. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2012 May 4.
Published in final edited form as:

Both Resistance and Agility Training Reduce Fall Risk in 75–85 Year Old Women with Low Bone Mass: A Six-Month Randomized Controlled Trial

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the effectiveness of group resistance and agility training programs in reducing fall risk in community-dwelling older women with low bone mass.

DESIGN

A randomized, controlled, single-blinded 25-week prospective study with assessments at baseline, midpoint and trial completion.

SETTING

Community centre.

PARTICIPANTS

Community-dwelling women aged 75–85 years with low bone mass.

INTERVENTION

Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Resistance Training (n=32), Agility Training (n=34), and Stretching (sham) exercises (n=32). The exercise classes for each study arm were held twice weekly.

MEASUREMENTS

The primary outcome measure was fall risk (derived from weighted scores from tests of postural sway, reaction time, strength, proprioception, and vision), as measured by a physiological profile assessment (PPA). Secondary outcome measures were ankle dorsiflexion strength, foot reaction time and the Community Balance and Mobility (CB&M) Scale.

RESULTS

Attendance at the exercise sessions for all three groups was excellent: Resistance Training (85.4%), Agility Training (87.3%) and Stretching program (78.8%). At the end of the trial, PPA fall risk scores were reduced by 57.3% and 47.5% in the Resistance and Agility training groups respectively, but by only 20.2% in the Stretching group. In both the Resistance and Agility groups, the reduction in falls risk was mediated primarily by improved postural stability, where sway was reduced by 30.6% and 29.2% respectively. There were no significant differences among the groups for the secondary outcomes measures. Within the Resistance Training group reductions in sway were significantly associated with improved strength as assessed by increased squat load used in the exercise sessions.

CONCLUSION

These findings support the implementation of community-based resistance and agility training programs to reduce fall risk in older women with low bone mass. Such programs may have particular public health benefits as it has been shown that this group are at increased risk of falling as well as sustaining fall-related fractures.

Keywords: Accidental Falls, Fall Risk, Exercise, Aged, Low Bone Mass

Quelle und Full Text:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3344816/

 

JÖRG LINDER AKTIV-TRAINING
Mauerbergstraße 110
76534 Baden-Baden
Tel.: 07223 / 8004699
Mobil: 0177 / 4977232
Mail: info@aktiv-training.de
Fax: 07223 / 8005271 
Prävention:  www.preventex.de

 


 
 

 

Falls in older people: epidemiology, risk factors and strategies for prevention

Laurence Z. Rubenstein

Abstract

Falls are a common and often devastating problem among older people, causing a tremendous amount of morbidity, mortality and use of health care services including premature nursing home admissions. Most of these falls are associated with one or more identifiable risk factors (e.g. weakness, unsteady gait, confusion and certain medications), and research has shown that attention to these risk factors can significantly reduce rates of falling. Considerable evidence now documents that the most effective (and cost-effective) fall reduction programmes have involved systematic fall risk assessment and targeted interventions, exercise programmes and environmental-inspection and hazard-reduction programmes. These findings have been substantiated by careful meta-analysis of large numbers of controlled clinical trials and by consensus panels of experts who have developed evidence-based practice guidelines for fall prevention and management. Medical assessment of fall risks and provision of appropriate interventions are challenging because of the complex nature of falls. Optimal approaches involve interdisciplinary collaboration in assessment and interventions, particularly exercise, attention to co-existing medical conditions and environmental inspection and hazard abatement.

Quelle:  http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/content/35/suppl_2/ii37.short

Full Text / pdf / online im internet – Zugriff vom 02.10.2012 – Falls in older people: epidemiology, risk factors and strategies for prevention – http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/content/35/suppl_2/ii37.full.pdf

JÖRG LINDER AKTIV-TRAINING – www.aktiv-training.de

Ihr Personal Trainer für Baden-Baden, Sinzheim, Bühl,  Karlsruhe, Offenburg, Freiburg, Breisgau, Pforzheim, Stuttgart   (überregional auf Anfrage)


JÖRG LINDER AKTIV-TRAINING
Mauerbergstraße 110
76534 Baden-Baden
Tel.: 07223 / 8004699
Mobil: 0177 / 4977232
Mail: info@aktiv-training.de
Fax: 07223 / 8005271

3 Rückenübungen mit dem eigenen Körpergewicht

Video von:  poundattack / http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66lk-OtgS_0

……vor allem die erste Übung im Stehen (Bent Over T´s) eignet sich für ein kleines Zwischendurch-Training im Büro.

 

JÖRG LINDER AKTIV-TRAINING – www.aktiv-training.de

Ihr Personal Trainer für Baden-Baden, Sinzheim, Bühl,  Karlsruhe, Offenburg, Freiburg, Breisgau, Pforzheim, Stuttgart   (überregional auf Anfrage)

JÖRG LINDER AKTIV-TRAINING
Mauerbergstraße 110
76534 Baden-Baden
Tel.: 07223 / 8004699
Mobil: 0177 / 4977232
Mail: info@aktiv-training.de
Fax: 07223 / 8005271